cruden shares latest approach to MINIMIZing  LATENCY ON A DRIVING SIMULATOR 

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Together with colleagues from Audi AG and the University of Stuttgart, Cruden has shared details of its latest breakthrough research in synchronizing and minimizing driving simulator latency research at the Driving Simulation Conference (DSC) in Paris (September 7-9, 2016).   

 

The result, zero simulator-induced latency, will allow car manufacturers and motorsport teams to use validated car models directly on the simulator without having to make modifications to compensate for simulator hardware and software delays.

 

Latency has always been a challenge in the design of driving simulators when trying to replicate exactly the handling characteristics and driving experience of a real car caused primarily by sampling delays, processing time and data transfer. This latency means that additional time elapses between the model output and the resulting feedback from the simulator when compared to the real vehicle. Hence, lowest possible latency and fast response are needed to provide the most accurate and realistic driving experience on a simulator.

 

In short, Cruden has achieved this by first predicting the visuals from the output of the vehicle model in order to synchronize them with the simulator’s motion platform and other feedback channels. A second step involves applying additional prediction algorithms to all system channels based instead on inputs using the available information about steering wheel position and velocity. This prediction can compensate for all delays that are not a result of the dynamics of the vehicle model, to effectively reach a state of zero simulator-induced latency.

 

This methodology has been tested on two 6-DOF simulators: an automotive simulator with an off-board projection screen used for chassis development at Audi AG and a motorsport simulator with three screens mounted on the top platform and a Formula 3 car model.

 

For a full explanation of the approach, please follow this link to our longer web article. To learn more or to request the technical paper: Implementing prediction algorithms to synchronize and minimize latency on a driving simulator" by van Doornik, Jelle, Brems, Willibald, de Vries, Edwin and Wiedemann, Jochen, please email info@cruden.com.

 

Together with colleagues from Audi AG, Cruden has shared details of its latest breakthrough research in synchronizing and minimizing driving simulator latency research at the Driving Simulation Conference (DSC) in Paris (September 7-9, 2016).The result, zero simulator-induced latency, will allow car manufacturers and motorsport teams to use validated car models directly on the simulator without having to make modifications to compensate for simulator hardware and software delays.

 

Latency has always been a challenge in the design of driving simulators when trying to replicate exactly the handling characteristics and driving experience of a real car caused primarily by sampling delays, processing time and data transfer. This latency means that additional time elapses between the driver input and the resulting stimulus generated by the simulator when compared to the real vehicle. Hence, lowest possible latency and fast response are needed to provide the most accurate and realistic driving experience on a simulator.

 

In short, Cruden has achieved this by first predicting the visuals from the output of the vehicle model in order to synchronize them with the simulator’s motion platform and other feedback channels. A second step involves applying additional prediction algorithms to all system channels based instead on inputs using the available information about steering wheel position and velocity. This prediction can compensate for all delays that are not a result of the dynamics of the vehicle model, to effectively reach a state of zero simulator-induced latency.

 

This methodology has been tested on two 6-DOF simulators: an automotive simulator with an off-board projection screen used for chassis development at Audi AG and a motorsport simulator with three screens mounted on the top platform and a Formula 3 car model.

 

For a full explanation of the approach, please follow this link to our longer web article. To learn more or to request the technical paper: Implementing prediction algorithms to synchronize and minimize latency on a driving simulator" by van Doornik, Jelle, Brems, Willibald, de Vries, Edwin and Wiedemann, Jochen, please email info@cruden.com.

Together with colleagues from Audi AG, Cruden has shared details of its latest breakthrough research in synchronizing and minimizing driving simulator latency research at the Driving Simulation Conference (DSC) in Paris (September 7-9, 2016).   

 

The result, zero simulator-induced latency, will allow car manufacturers and motorsport teams to use validated car models directly on the simulator without having to make modifications to compensate for simulator hardware and software delays.

 

Latency has always been a challenge in the design of driving simulators when trying to replicate exactly the handling characteristics and driving experience of a real car caused primarily by sampling delays, processing time and data transfer. This latency means that additional time elapses between the driver input and the resulting stimulus generated by the simulator when compared to the real vehicle. Hence, lowest possible latency and fast response are needed to provide the most accurate and realistic driving experience on a simulator.

 

In short, Cruden has achieved this by first predicting the visuals from the output of the vehicle model in order to synchronize them with the simulator’s motion platform and other feedback channels. A second step involves applying additional prediction algorithms to all system channels based instead on inputs using the available information about steering wheel position and velocity. This prediction can compensate for all delays that are not a result of the dynamics of the vehicle model, to effectively reach a state of zero simulator-induced latency.

 

This methodology has been tested on two 6-DOF simulators: an automotive simulator with an off-board projection screen used for chassis development at Audi AG and a motorsport simulator with three screens mounted on the top platform and a Formula 3 car model.

 

For a full explanation of the approach, please follow this link to our longer web article. To learn more or to request the technical paper: Implementing prediction algorithms to synchronize and minimize latency on a driving simulator" by van Doornik, Jelle, Brems, Willibald, de Vries, Edwin and Wiedemann, Jochen, please email info@cruden.com.

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